Appendix 1

NEW EQUALITIES ACT COMPLIANT POLICY PROPOSAL

Appendix 1

Nowadays many people use the term ‘transgender’ as an umbrella term (as we do in this guidance). An alternative word is ‘trans’. Some prefer the use of ‘trans’ as it avoids ambiguity and recognises the original distinct meaning of ‘transgender’.

 “Trans” covers people whose gender identity and gender expression differ from  their sex (ie, male or female). A person’s gender identity is their self-perception of their gender, whilst gender expression is a person’s external gender-related appearance and behaviour.

Transgender people may or may not choose to alter their bodies hormonally and/or surgically.  Known as gender reassignment or transition this is usually a complex process that takes place over a long period of time.  Many people will change their name, and some will also apply for and receive a gender recognition certificate.

Transgender people are therefore quite clearly diverse. People perceive and express their gender identity in different ways and there are a number of other gender identities which fall within the trans umbrella. They include (but are not limited to) people who are cross dressers, non-binary, gender fluid, drag kings and queens, or agender.  

The Equality Act (2010) contains protections for people who plan to undergo, are undergoing, or have undergone gender reassignment   as laid out in the Gender Recognition Act 2004.   These are transsexual women (  (males who have a female gender identity and are transitioning to live completely and permanently as women); and transsexual men ( (females who have a male gender identity and are transitioning to live completely and permanently as men). 

However, these protections do not apply to people who have other identities within the trans umbrella.

GLASGOW LIFE CURRENT POLICY STATES

This Appendix caused a great deal of concern amongst the general public because it stated that “cross-dressers” were to be treated as trans customers, and protected by the Equality Act, when they absolutely were not.

Appendix 1

Nowadays many people use the term ‘transgender’ as an umbrella term (as we do in this guidance). An alternative word is ‘trans’. Some prefer the use of ‘trans’ as it avoids ambiguity and recognises the original distinct meaning of ‘transgender’.

Transgender (or trans) is an umbrella term, which covers people whose gender identity and gender expression differ from the gender they were labelled with at birth. A person’s gender identity is their self-perception of their gender, whilst gender expression is a person’s external gender-related appearance and behaviour. The groups covered by the term transgender are:

 Transsexual women (people labelled male at birth, but who have a female gender identity and are transitioning to live completely and permanently as women);  Transsexual men (who are labelled female at birth, but have a male gender identity and are transitioning to live completely and permanently as men);  Intersex people (people whose internal / external reproductive organs or chromosomes are inbetween what is considered to be male and female);  Androgyne and polygender people (who do not feel comfortable being described as male or female, but may describe their gender as being a mixture of male and female aspects, or may reject defining their gender at all); and  Cross-dressing people (who cross-dress because they feel more comfortable expressing themselves in particular feminine or masculine clothing).

There is a lack of agreement between people as to which terms they prefer. Therefore the safest practice is always to ask someone which way they would prefer to be described. 

It is advisable to only ever use these terms as adjectives. Calling someone ‘a transsexual’ is often considered to be as rude as calling someone ‘a black’. Similarly, it is considered best practice to refer to ‘a transgender person’ rather than ‘a transgendered person’.

Regardless of how far a transgender person’s transition has progressed it is always considered polite and respectful to use terms that acknowledge their identity as a man or woman. Thus a transsexual person who is transitioning from a former male role to a female one would usually wish to be referred to as ‘she’ or ‘her’ and for people to refer to her as a woman. The same applies in reverse to trans men (going from female to male).

 Transgender people are therefore quite clearly diverse. People perceive and express their gender identity in different ways. The experience of discrimination, transphobic harassment, anti-social behaviour and a lack understanding of transsexual issues is common to all transgender people though. 

Transgender people may or may not choose to alter their bodies hormonally and/or surgically.  Known as gender reassignment or transition this is usually a complex process that takes place over a long period of time. 

The Equality Act (2010) contains protections for people who plan to undergo, are undergoing, or have undergone gender reassignment.   It is good practice for the purpose of accessing facilities to consider a transgender person to have changed their gender at the time of their choosing. Many people will change their name, and many will also apply for and receive a gender recognition certificate.

Leave a comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Create your website with WordPress.com
Get started
%d bloggers like this: